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to earlier between how science deals with this question and how lawyers deal with this question is that you actually get a fundamental disconnect between the two systems. so you mentioned that lack of emotional control or lack of ability to control your preferences might lead to insanity, but, in fact, in most jurisdictions as you know, that's not true. after hanky was acquitted under the american law institute test because he could not control his behavior, congress in most state jurisdictions changed the law, got rid of the lack of emotional test, the a.l.i. test and now in most jurisdictions, the nontest requires that you demonstrate that you can't distinguish right from wrong. so now we have, and again, the law uses science for the law's own purposes, but what is problematic here is the disconnect. from the criminal side, if you lack emotional control, you go to prison because you can't win under the test because the test doesn't apply. when you walk out of prison and you lack emotional control, you get civilly committed. so what we have is a fundamental disconnect between how we view p
borrowing is something they are not able to do. someone who is getting a bachelor of science in nursing can afford to take on more debt than someone getting a degree in religious studies or a low income field. it does not mean you should abandon the degree. it means you should pay attention to the debt, because you may abandon the dream later. >> not all degrees are worth as much is something those of us who love liberal arts in the united states have a hard time coming to grips with. >> or journalism. >> is -- it obviously makes people uncomfortable that the situation is further curtailed by the family were born into. if you are a wonderful high school student, you have to think more about your major and your college than a student born into a wealthy family. how do you balance that with the reality of this crisis. >> one of the things we do at the national consumer law center is direct representation of low-income borrowers as well as speak to thousands of borrowers throughout the country. we do see the effect of this threw out the country. many students do not graduate. there is default.
reproduction system. [laughter] a lecture by tied a can and a member of the house committee on science and technology is the guy than there was a theory that on me just was not a good candidate and did not connect very well and was somewhat awkward. remember when he went to michigan and said trees were the right to heighth. the actual quote was a love this state. it seems right that the trees are the right height. [laughter] away from here i find no trees in that please. no trees as such a perfect height as these. can never be at ease with trees that grow higher than one's knees or too high to splinter in the breeze. wisconsin can have their bragging rights on cheese and colorado is where you take your skis and connecticut as lyme disease. [laughter] and another visa my prepared to sneeze but here we have the perfect height of trees. [applause] according to that theory romney was not a good candidate they should have been nominated somebody else. also a theory there were demographically behind and did not understand the people they were appealing to was no longer in the majority i trie
nation," we love a good science fiction story. and this year, the gop gave us plenty of fantasy. our next award is the ray bradbury award for lead performance in a science fiction role. it's one of my favorites. watch this. >> by the end of my second term, we will have the first permanent base on the moon. and it will be american. >> it seems to me, first of all, from what i understand from doctors, that's really rare. if it's a legitimate rape, the female body has ways to try to shut that whole thing down. >> i stood up and said the science is bogus. the dangers of carbon dioxide? tell that to a plant how dangerous carbon dioxide is. >> all the candidates are so deserving. but the revvie can only go to one person. and it goes to newt gingrich for his out-of-this-world ideas. congratulations, newt. your revvie will be waiting for you at the moon base when you get there. we'll be right back. >> the revvies will return with president obama, clint eastwood, and carl rove. plus, the award for political performer of the year. you're watching the second annual revvie awards only on msnbc. jamie
exploratorium while still at the palace of fine arts one more day to do it. hantdz on science museum reopen at new home in april. so admission at the old building is free for now. dan looks back at the report. >> palless of fine arts originally built for the 1915 panama pacific exposition. it was made to lack like an ancient ruin with huge display hall alongside it. half century later that hall would be reborn as revolutionary new museum. >> tornado t.you help mick a tornado. >>reporter: man with the idea was frank oppenheimer. >> whole point of the exploratorium is to make it possible for people to feel they can understand the world around them. i think a lot of people have given up with that understanding. >> frank was a brilliant physicist and educator. he died in 1985 but legacy is intensely alive both in the museum itself and in documentaries including one by filmmaker john els. frank pioneer of the hand on museum. instead of don't touch the exhibit, touching them was essential. at first it was a hard sell. >> really new idea. used to carry an exhibit around in the truching o
was first in awarding engineering, math, science doctorates. first in the world. now we are 37th. where is the demand? there is nothing exciting going non-. our kids seem to get excited because there is a new iphone out. rather than we are going to the moon. i would like to talk a little bit about managers managing research companies. and manager, unless he himself is the creator, the technical mind, he overdoes -- excuse me, he does the wrong job. he should be out setting a goal only. he should also spend time raising the money peeping but he should not run the program. and this little quotation by a brilliant man -- if you want to build a ship, don't drum up people to collect would -- wood. well, it is you, the manager, who has selected the materials to make the product. if you give them tasks to do, then he has decided the manufacturing method. he thinks it is his responsibility as a manager because he is running the program, but what he will do is he will make a decision so that innovation cannot occur. and that is the main reason that companies that try to be innovative are not inn
the bang for the box -- the buck. the basic science knowledge. testimony point out that we need to know these things. there are other societal benefits. isn't that really the way we should think of going? if dark basic expansion of knowledge through a government funded entity like nasa -- is that the way we should go? my personal feeling is there is a tremendous value over time that has come close from demand i do believe robotics will be on the time scale of the next 20 years as -- or so. probably as they make predictions, which is always hard. it will have more economic impact on how we were driving our cars and fly our planes and how research is being performed. it is my belief if you go through 30 or more years, that prediction will be a lot tougher to make. want to put the human in the loop and go to places where you do not know where you are going, and two exploration the help of sun cover aspects of our experience and did all aspects of technology that will have tremendous impact. even though they examples you mention are compelling, there are many aspects that come from a human
a good science fiction story. and this year, the gop gave us plenty of fantasy. our next award is the ray bradbury for lead performance in a science fiction role. it's one of miff favorites. watch this. >> by the end of my second term, we will have the first permanent base on the moon and it will be american. >> first of all, if it's a legitimate rape, the fe plael body has ways to shut that whole thing double. >> the dangers of carbon dioxide. tell that to a plant how dangerous carbon dioxide is. >> all the candidates are so deserving. but the revvie can only go to one pirn and it's to newt gingrich. congr congratulatio congratulations, newt. we'll be right back. >> the revvies will return with president obama, clint eastwood, carl rove, plus the award for pli political performer of the year. [ thunder crashes ] [ male announcer ] if you think all batteries are the same... consider this: when the unexpected happens, there's one brand of battery more emergency workers trust in their maglites: duracell. one reason: duralock power preserve. it locks in power for up to 10 years in storage. g
cuts should be extended and for whom. taxation is not an economic science. it definitely -- if you gather 10 people in a room, you're going to get 10 different opinions and the views on taxing -- on the merits and philosophy of taxing individual asks the rich will vary. but, you know, this sort of immediate problem is not necessarily the larger philosophical question. it really is the more practical question of what is our tax system going to look like. host: and we've got this lead editorial from this morning's "wall street journal." real housewife offense the beltway. they write -- host: back to the phones. don in oklahoma city on our line for democrats. go ahead, don. caller: good morning. i have a couple of quick comments i would like to make. the first is that i find it ironic for so many years in recent history republicans have claimed to own patriotism yet they don't seem to want to vacate their fair share. host: joseph rosenberg. guest: you know, i mean, i'm not sure, you know, i'm not sure this is about pay. -- patriotism or anything like that. you know, the question of wh
piece looking at the world will be like in 150 years in the role of science and technology will play in our future. thanks so much for being with us from new york city today. guest: thanks for having me. happy new year. host: why look into the future? guest: you know, the world as we know, the world did not end on december 21st. so, i think this is really good time to look -- we've been all sort of focused on that date, not all of us, some of us. this is a good time to look into the future. we have a very popular department that we do every month called 50 and 100 and 150 years ago. this is where we go back into the archives of scientific american and we pick out things that people were writing and a lot of things people were writing were predictions about what the future would bring. we thought that we would turn it on its head and actually just do a whole package of articles in our january issue which is out on newsstands now. it looks at what could happen scientifically, technologically in the next 50, 100 and 150 years. host: you look at things like drone. also nuclear issues
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> we're about to say good-bye to 2012 but not before talking about some of the top legal cases of the year. for that we bring in the legal guys. avery friedman, a civil rights attorney and law professor in my hometown, cleveland, and richard herman, a new york criminal defense attorney and law professor who joins us from las vegas. hello, happy holidays to both of you. >> same to you, marty. all the best. >> you, too. >> let's talk first jerry sandusky. a few things to bring up here. as we all remember, he was the penn state assistant football coach convicted in june on 45 counts of child sex abuse. he's now serving 30 to 60 years in prison. jerry sandusky says that he has now focused or he is focused on his appeal. he's got a hearing that i believe is set for january 10th on his pretrial motions. guys, there's a newspaper in northeastern pennsylvania that says sandusky sent a handwritten note saying he is trying to endure, and there was a lo
the way, he developed a literary curiosity that pivots from dystopian visions of science fiction to the 19th century classic novel, "moby dick." in captain ahab's whaling crew, men of every race are thrown together in pursuit of the elusive and the mythical. diaz sees in this a parable of america then and now. he teaches creative writing at m.i.t. and recently received a prestigious macarthur fellowship, the well-known and coveted "genius grant." junot diaz, welcome. >> oh, thank you for having me. >> well, i've wanted to have you, because i've wanted to ask one of america's foremost storytellers, "what's the story you're telling yourself out of this election?" >> whew, it was bananas watching that election. but i think probably the thing that comes out most forcefully after the election is how little people were expecting the voting, the sort of, the electoral body that made obama's victory possible. i mean, i think there was -- no one was talking about the sort of numbers that showed up for obama. no one was predicting the diversity of the vote. no one was predicting that sort of the rep
each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. it's just common sense. and you wouldn't have it any other way.e. but your erectile dysfunction - you know, that could be a question of blood flow. cialis tadalafil for daily use helps you be ready anytime the moment's right. you can be more confident in your ability to be ready. and the same cialis is the only daily ed tablet approved to treat ed and symptoms of bph, like needing to go frequently or urgently. tell your doctor about all your medical conditions and medications, and ask if your heart is healthy enough for sexual activity. do not take cialis if you take nitrates for chest pain, as this may cause an unsafe drop in blood pressure. do not drink alcohol in excess with cialis. side effects may include headache, upset stomach, delayed backache or muscle ache. to avoid long-term injury, seek immediate medical help for an erection lasting more than four hours. if you have any sudden decrease or loss in hearing or vision, or if you have any allergic reactions such as rash, hives, swelling of the
or reimagined seven industries. he did it, isaacson says, by standing at the crossroads of science and the humanities, connecting creativity with technology, and combining leaps of imagination with feats of engineering to produce new devices that consumers hadn't even thought of. >> thank you for coming. we're gonna make some history together today. >> if you had to pick a day where it all came together, january 9, 2007, is not a bad one. jobs is in san francisco at the macworld conference in full pitchman mode as he unveils his latest product to the faithful. >> these are not three separate devices. this is one device. [cheers and applause] and we are calling it iphone. >> it is not only a remarkable achievement but a validation of everything that jobs believed in: if you made and controlled all of your own hardware and all of your own software, you could integrate all of your products and all of your content seamlessly into one digital hub. and no one but steve jobs had thought of it. >> this is something microsoft couldn't do 'cause it made software but not the hardware. it's so
.s. government is calling in the national academy of sciences for yet another safety review of airport scanners. the department of homeland security says the nonprofit group of scientists will be charged with reviewing previous studies done on the scanners. the call comes amid continuing concerns from some members of congress, as well as some scientists, about the amount of radiation that the scanners subject travelers to. brave investors who bought junk-rated greek bonds in january of 2012 are sitting on profits. the highly-risky bond buy during an extremely volatile time for the country has earned investors 20 times more than people who purchased top-rated german debt this year. bloomberg news reports the return on the greek junk bonds is up 80%, compared to a gain of just 3.7% for german bonds. it helped that greece's credit rating was upgraded to b- in june from "selective default" when the greek soveriegn debt was restructed. making those new year's resolutions to live healthier affects your waistline and your wallet. bankrate.com has listed some of those popular resolutions and crunched
. do a lot of returns. >> reporter: stores throughout the mall displayed sale science, some showing as much as 75%off. >> we want to sell as much, put the spring goods out. we are going to be -- i know we are. >> reporter: november and december count up to 40% of yearly sales, the last two months before christmas were the weakest since 2008. retailers hope to make up by slashing prices, customers had different take its on the deals they saw. >> last year was much better. >> reporter: dispointing? >> little bit. >> 50% off at gap. marked down -- i got tanks, underwear and, yeah. >> reporter: you are happy. >> yeah. >> reporter: and many are expecting to use their gift cards today and they will have plenty of chances to do that. the mall has extended hours today here at valley fair. they will be open until ten tonight. ktvu. >> thank you. for a lot of people the gifts are now unwrapped and sorted. before going to the customer service counter you need to check that exchange poll civil wal-mart has one of the most for giving, taking almost all items for 90 days. the exception is e
carolina science institute. the fallen stars recovered from the christmas eve heist are worth over $80,000. >>> it may not have the madness of times square but folks in lisburn, pennsylvania, have their own wacky way of ringing in the new year. on new year's eve the town drops yellow britches in honor of the yellow breeches creek. creative. >>> organizers in southern california applied the finishing touches to the incredible mobile flower arrangements that will make up the 124th tournament of roses parade. marching bands and floats are ready to go. you can watch that entire parade on nbc. >>> in nebraska, folks have a unique way of getting rid of the holiday, treat the fruitcake. the fruitcake filleting. people of all ages jumps at the chance, nice arm, to chuck the unwanted christmas gifts. >>> now for entertainment news. what's the new year without a psy update? he rang in the new year at times square telling jay gray he might be ready to move on from gangnam style. >> i cannot just, you know, stay here. i got to move forward. i'm working on a new thing. but if i keep doing this and
connected to the stealing of 100 unique meteorites. loaned to a north carolina science institute. the fallen stars recovered in the christmas eve heist are worth more than $80,000. >>> it may not have the madness of times square, but the folks in lisbon, pennsylvania, have their own wacky way of ringing in the new year. on new year's eve, the town drops these yellow britches in honor of the yellow britches creek. i get it. it's funny. >>> and finally, organizers in is south carolina put the tip theiring toughs to the incredible mobile flower arrangements that will make up the 124th tournament of roses parade. marching bands and floats are ready to go and you can watch the entire parade right here on nbc. >>> now to sports. let's get started with college football. good appetite yesterday. clemson down to the kick. time's running out, it's good. clemson upsets number 8 lsu. 25-24. in the sun bowl, georgia tech wins over usc. and the music city bowl, jordan rodgers ran for another score. and the commodores beat north carolina state. to the liberty bowl, three touchdowns beat iowa state 31-17. t
first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. the red cross was down here all the time. [ man ] they've given us a lot of heart. in times of need, they're there. ♪ [ kerry ] my dad was watching his house burn. he turned around, and all of a sudden, there was this guy standing there from the red cross. at a point where i had just lost everything, the idea that there was someone there... that's an amazing thing. ♪ temerity, temer . >>> the rising political star of 2013, chris hayes, who will that be? >> massachusetts senator elizabeth warren, i think it is not an easy thing to do what she did. you know, she was a star on this network and among progressives, but to go on particularly in massachusetts, i think she will be absolutely a force in massachusetts. >> it pains me to say it, but this is going to be the year when corey booker, he is either going to run for governor -- >> krystal, the rising star. >> the youngest woman in the house, also the first hindu-american woman in congress, combat veteran, really an amazing woman.
things, like what the market is doing and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >>> our second story "outfront." is chuck hagel's nomination dead on arrival? now hagel, the former republican senator and vietnam war hero, could be president obama's choice to be the next defense secretary. but today he's under attack by a group of gay republicans known as the log cabin republicans. now, this full-page ad said hagel's wrong for the job because of a statement he made back in 1998, when he questioned whether, in his words, a quote, openly, aggressively gay nominee could be an effective u.s. ambassador. now, a lot's changed since then, and hagel has since apologized, though that has also come under attack for his somewhat controversial beliefs on israel, iraq, and iran. are these attacks justified, or is he just the latest political target in an ugly game of gotcha politics. "outfront" tonight, our all-star panel. ryan, let me start with you. let's look at chuck hagel's credentials. a vietnam war veteran, two purple hearts,
on popular opinion you're on shifting sands. things change. in fact, science changes. nothing is more worthless than a science textbook from the '50s. >> but what shouldn't change from the original constitution of america, surely. >> my faith isn't based on the constitution, it's based on -- >> i get that. but america in terms of its populism, it's about fairness and equality. i went to see "lincoln" the movie a few weeks ago. it was a riveting movie, daniel day lewis is brilliant as lincoln. but all about how he fought in his last few months as president to get slavery abolished. there were millions of americans who thought slavery was perfectly acceptable. who was outraged at what he was doing. he was not trying to make something popular at the moment. he knew instinctively it was just wrong, unfair, unequal. >> and why did he know that? because it's in the bible. >> right, but we had this discussion. >> it's in the bible. he was building it on biblical truth. the bible says every man should be free. >> but you don't believe every man should be free and equal? >> of course we're fre
. you say that this is unsound science and potentially could lead to problems. why do you believe that there is not a value in at least looking at this gunman's dna? >> well, first of all, let me say that my heart goes out to all the people in newtown, connecticut. this was an horrific series of events. second of all, the major problem that i have as a geneticist is that it's impossible to gain much information with the sample size of one. so what you are looking at is one person's dna, and you're trying to say that it's different than other people. but you only have a sample size of one. >> would it be helpful, do you think, to look at the dna of other shooters of those from previous mass shootings? >> well, again, the problem is, we have probably less than five or even ten people that we're talking about. when studies -- accurate genetic studies are done on a whole population, we look for hundreds of different people, and you have to show a strong correlation with that. and the second problem would be what are we trying to look for? i mean, we're going -- the whole idea is you'r
his testimony before the house science, space and technology committee. i know that our chairman mr. hall will remember that during that testimony, he argued eloquently for the critical importance of giving nasa a sustainable future and a human exploration program that can once again inspire our children and humanity around the world. it seems rather extraordinary that even as we are honoring our hero, neil armstrong, that we face a situation where nasa's budget would be designated, getting the very programs that neil armstrong felt so passionately about. if the same members who vote to honor him today will commit to working in the coming months and years for those exploration goals, to those heights to which he devoted the last years of his life, we will have truly honored neil armstrong in an enduring and meaningful way. with that, i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman reserves. the gentleman from texas. mr. hall: madam speaker, i yield five minutes to the very capable majority whip, the gentleman from california, mr. mccarthy. the speaker pro
what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >>> an update from south africa tonight on nelson mandela. the 94-year-old former president was released from a hospital after almost three weeks of being treated for a lung infection and surgery to remove gallstones. mandela was moved to his home in johannesburg where he will continue his recovery. >>> china opened the world's longest high-speed rail line today. the train travels more than 1,400 miles from beijing in the north to the south of china, a trip that until now took 20 hours. the new train traveling at 186 miles per hour cuts the time to just eight hours. hundreds of the new trains will be put into service on this line alone, as china moves toward its goal of building a nationwide high-speed rail network. >>> and back in this country, a lost and found story involving a best friend. it all began christmas eve outside a grocery store here in new york where a security camera shows a man stealing a dog and then walking away. that dog's name is marlee. a woman who saw him trying to sell the d
math metically, where science ends, the part that makes you feel good but you don't know why, the way the object feels and looks and you can almost if it's perfectly created explain it to somebody else afterwards but in the creation part you can't. you can see how the glass is constantly moving. my job is to basically shape it. and balance it at the same time. you do that, you get these wonderful shapes, glass really rewards the risk. lot of times with glass you're waiting for the piece to cool down and temperature to adjust and split seconds where you've got a fraction of a second to make a particular move in a particular way and you don't get to repeat it if could you it wrong so there's a performance to it. it's sort of like dancing. you can't really think about it and do it really. you just have to do it enough that it becomes sort of mechanical, and then you can sort of free your mind to design. ♪ [ male announcer ] some day, your life will flash before your eyes. make it worth watching. introducing the 2013 lexus ls. an entirely new pursuit. >>> a member of the paparazzi is de
him, nd he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> announcer: 'tis the season of more-- more shopping, more dining out... and along with it, more identity theft. by the time this holiday season is over, an estimated 1.2 million identities may be stolen. every time you pull out your wallet, shop online or hit the road, you give thieves a chance to ruin your holiday. by the time you're done watching this, as many as 40 more identities may be stolen. you can't be on the lookout 24/7, but lifelock can. they're relentless about protecting your identity every minute of every day. when someone tries to take over your bank accounts, drain the equity in your home, or even tries to buy a car in your name, lifelock is on guard. and with lifelock's 24/7 alerts, they contact you by text, phone or email as soon as they detect suspicious activity in their network. lifelock wants you to be protected this holiday season, so they're giving you 60 days of protection risk-free. >> my years as a prosecutor taugh
't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> greta: is story right out of jurassic park. a florida man pleaded guilty to smuggling stolen dinosaur bones from >> a keleton to a new york buyer for more than $1 million. that is when it caught the eye of federal officials. homeland security conducted an investigation into the fishy fossil dealings and in october arrested the florida dealer. prosecutors calling him a one man black market in prehistoric fossils and yesterday he pleaded guilty to smuggling charges and agreed to give up the one million dollars dinosaur skeleton. it will be returned to mongolia and the smuggler facing up to 17 years in prison. if a giant stolen dinosaur can get into the u.s. droid dna augmentation initiated. vision expanding to a 5-inch 1080p hd display and camera. touch acquiring nfc. hearing evolving with beats audio. wireless charging activated. introducing droid dna by htc. it's not an upgrade to your phone. it's an upgrade to yourself. [ male announcer ] it started long ago. the joy of giving something everything you've got. it takes passion
bombshelters and worried about missal gaps, science spelled national security. >> the cold war had been prolonged. it was going on. nobody could really see an end to it.n there were all of the under lying risks of nuclear confrontation at the time. >> the next step in that race, manned launches that required a few good men, seven to start. >> there was 110 originally people selected by the air force and the navy to become astronauts. it widdled down to 32 after the interviews and things like that, 32 that went to the clinic. i was the only guy to flunk. >> how come you didn't pass the mercury physicals? >> i had what was known as a high bilirubin which is a pigment in your blood. with that they said, well, you are out. >> you said at a time when you were a little boy you can be with the dinasaurs or the -- you can be into dinasaurs or rockets. >> when i didn't get into the per ruer key -- mercury program i said i was interested in rockets before those guys could spell it. >> projectco mercury began in 1958 with the goals of putting a human in orbit and doing so before the soviets did. o
was given the boot by security. >> academy motion pictures arts and sciences extended the oscar voting deadline to tomorrow over fears issues of the new electronic voting system we will learn who was nominated next week patti ann. >> top sports stories northern illinois makes the first trip to the bowl championship series but it was anything but memorable. it was no match for the orange bowl. the huskies lost 31-10. they went on to beat the badgers 20-14. stanford's first rose bowl victory in 40 years. >>> angie reed may not be without a team for too long. they contacted the former coach and topic to coach the team. espn reports he could accept the job by the end of the week. >>> all things must come to an end including the clipper's 17 game winning streak. the nuggets won it was the longest streak since 2008 and franchise record for the clippers. >> the time 42 after the hour. still to come they asked members to pay more money but it turns out one teacher's union wanted to raise dues to pay for parties. we always hear being fat can kill you but could holding on to just a few extra pou
guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> can you imaoo as we told you the hour a health square for secretary of state hillary clinton is being treated for a blood clot. we are live outside of the presbyterian hospital with the latest on her condition. >> we are told secretary of state clinton is being treated at new york presbyterian hospital. it is believed she is here at the washington heights campus. she is being treated for a blood clot as a result of a fall she took in december. she hasn't been seen or heard from since she came down with a stomach virus earlier this month. result of this stomach virus we are told she fainted when she fainted this concussion occurred. she was having a routine follow up checkup with her doctor yesterday. this blood clot was discovered and she was brought down here to new york city. we are told from medical professionals that blood clots can be common if they are found in the leg. more severe when they come in the brain or lungs. we are told she is goin
display at the smithsonian in d.c. and the california science center in los angeles. >>> also another story we want to bring you out of florida. just check this out. unwelcome visitor at a picnic area in the everglades. look at that. family on vacation from arkansas took this video after a 17-foot burmese python was shot and killed by park rangers. the giant snakes, many of them former pets, have become a big, big, big nuisance in south florida. next month florida game officials will hold a hunting contest offering a $15,000 prize to the person who kills the most pythons. >>> all right, let's turn from snakes to flakes. the massive storm that's been causing huge problems since christmas day is finally over. maine was the last to deal with it. some places got a foot of fresh snow, but it's not over yet. meteorologist chad myers is in the cnn weather center with a look at that. so chad, you know, i thought when this storm came through, all right, fine. it wasn't so great. lots of snow. >> right. >> but it's over. not over yet. >> no, not over yet. and another one coming on its heels. an
. >> there's science to it. >> there's heavy science and we tell you all about it in the book. >> we know what happens when we eat junk food. we get father, but what happens inside the body? >> a lot of things happen. we eat too much we gain fat and it's toxic. it surrounds our vital organs causes a toxic disease. it's killing us. >> there's two things here what you eat and what you do with your body. what's going on, chris, with our body and what does it take to cement that habit? >> one of the nice things about the book nice guys don't talk about exercise a lot. we talk about it all the time. it's the flywheel of maintenance. it does all kinds of stuff to help you lose weight be healthier, more optimistic or more energetic. we told people it makes a world of sense to work out semi hard six days a week. people go, what? way too scarey. but you have to do it. >> weight's become a bad buzzsquoorks . >> wheat's become a bad buzz world. >> 1% of the americans have celiac disease and they can't have wheat in their diet. i think it's easy for us to say, hey, we can't eat whe
for a world in which science fiction is rapidly becoming science fact. >> we were put here to to touch, to smell, to taste, to see and to hear the universe. that's a great role. that's a great responsibility. >> osgood: it took more than just rocket fuel to propel sally ride into orbit. as america's first woman in space, she was a role model for those who dream of shooting for the stars. earl scruggs, he aimed high. his picking elevated the five-string bang owe from second fiddle status to star of the show. ♪ (andy griffith theme). >> reporter: no doubt you remember this tune. andy griffiths' may bury recalled our own hometowns as we remember them or wish they could have been. >> if you ever come by this way again, be sure and stop by. i hope you have more time though. we don't like to see folks hurrying through like this. >> osgood: he was something of a friend, one we'll remember for a long time to come. so long, andy. ♪ at last ♪ my love has come >> osgood: we leave it to you, the great etta james to close out our tribute to those who left us in 2012. we only wish we had a bit
wily... or weird... or wonderfully the market's behaving... which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. a body at rest tends to stay at rest... while a body in motion tends to stay in motion. staying active can actually ease arthritis symptoms. but if you have arthritis, staying active can be difficult. prescription celebrex can help relieve arthritis pain so your body can stay in motion. because just one 200mg celebrex a day can provide 24 hour relief for many with arthritis pain and inflammation. plus, in clinical studies, celebrex is proven to improve daily physical function so moving is easier. celebrex can be taken with or without food. and it's not a narcotic. you and your doctor should balance the benefits with the risks. all prescription nsaids, like celebrex, ibuprofen, naproxen, and meloxicam have the same cardiovascular warning. they all may increase the chance of heart attack or stroke, which can lead to death. this chance increases if you have heart disease or risk factors such as high blood pressure or when nsaids are taken for long period
aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. ♪ let's stay together >>> when you look at this picture, what do you think? at what point was it taken? >> i think we were campaigning in iowa. >> so why were you hugging her so hard in iowa? >> because i love my wife. >> and also, i hadn't seen him in a while. when you're campaigning, we're two ships passing in the night. and the first time i saw him was when i walked on stage to greet him. and that's my honey giving me a hug. >> how do you keep the fire going? >> that's a good question. >> you know, we've been married now 20 years. >> mm-hmm. >> like every marriage, i think, you know, you have your ups and you have your downs. but if you work through the tough times, the respect and love that you feel deepens. >> and then there's a lot of laughter, you know. >> and you're funnier. >> yeah. for the most part. >> everybody thinks he's pretty funny. i'm funnier than people think. >> you are. >> that may be. you may be funnier than people think. >> barbara walters in th
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